Day: February 28, 2020

Stop going on about your life story and talk about how your business helps others.


6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Nearly every website you visit these days has an “About” page, and for good reason: 64% of consumers report they have a strong relationship with a given brand because of shared values.

The “About” page of your site is a great place to share your origin story and company outlook. Too often, though, founders and authors use the “About” page to talk too much about themselves — and miss out on potential sales and inquiries as a result.

It’s important to be human, but let’s not kid ourselves: People visit your website to determine if you can help them solve their problems. Make your “About” page about them instead of yourself, and that will put you miles ahead of the competition.

The business world is masterful in the art of financial analysis — slicing and dicing balance sheets, stock performance charts, and profit-and-loss statements into dozens of arcane metrics (Omega ratio, anyone?) to assess a company’s performance, unlock hidden potential, and spot pockets of strengths and weaknesses.

I’d like to propose another metric: a company’s dysfunction tax.

There’s no need to reach for your calculator just yet, as the basic idea is pretty simple: For every dollar of revenue that your company brings in, figure out how many cents are being frittered away to cover the cost of dysfunction — the self-inflicted wounds of bad strategy, poor execution, and ineffective communication, among other things, within your organization. The hard part, of course, is knowing how to value the impact.

To set a baseline, let’s assume your company is paying some level of dysfunction tax, given that anytime you bring a bunch

Audiences are trending towards interactivity, personalization, and abstract design. Keep this in mind when branding your business.

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


The 2010s were defined by tech-based startups, think Uber and Airbnb, that shook up major industries like transportation and hospitality. While their products were revolutionary, at the end of the day it was their cutting-edge branding that really took these businesses to the next level. As we enter 2020, it’s important to strive towards branding that’s just as compelling and striking as the brands that dominated the last decade.

Also, younger generations, like later millennials and Generation Z’s, are gaining more buying power, so their tastes will determine the direction of branding trends. Here are four emerging trends that startups should keep track of when creating a noteworthy brand.

Related: Branding Strategies That Create Customers Who Spend 300% More

1. Interactive experiences encourage audiences to


Fears of (COVID-19) getting a tighter grip over most countries has triggered a panic across financial over the past few weeks. Most analysts have trimmed their growth forecast for the global economy, financial have been rattled by the developments.


Global share prices headed for the worst week since global financial crisis (GFC) in 2008 as investors braced for the to become a pandemic and rapidly spread around the world. Hopes that the epidemic that started in China would be over in a few months and economic activity would return to normal have been shattered, as new infections reported around the world now surpass those in China. READ MORE HERE



Here’s how leading brokerages have assessed the impact of this health scare on economy and


Nomura


The overall evidence points to a